ARTHUR DEIKMAN PDF

These works reflect a modern perspective on spirituality based on developmental, psychodynamic, and cognitive psychologies- informed by personal experience with the Zen Buddhist and Sufic traditions. Currently, Dr. Deikman is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, where he combines teaching, research and private practice. I had my students do it for fifteen minutes to a half hour and interviewed them on their experiences.

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These works reflect a modern perspective on spirituality based on developmental, psychodynamic, and cognitive psychologies- informed by personal experience with the Zen Buddhist and Sufic traditions. Currently, Dr. Deikman is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, where he combines teaching, research and private practice.

I had my students do it for fifteen minutes to a half hour and interviewed them on their experiences. There were some striking changes from their short period of meditation. I continued these experiments and it seemed to me that I was becoming a teacher of meditation and should know something about it.

I was in med. It was about I met Silas and had an interview with Suzuki-roshi at Sokoji. I said I was studying consciousness and wanted to know more about it.

I just teach my students how to hear the birds sing. Katagiri-sensei gave me zazen instruction. I called LA about the Yasutani sesshin and they said they were full but since Suzuki-roshi had recommended it they took me.

Maezumi-sensei was translating at the sesshin. It was hard but the food was great. Yasutani said we have to adjust our effort in working on a koan like a violinist tunes his bow. In that sesshin I felt like my head was so big. I got into altered states where my dimensions changed. I had scary experiences. In time they all went away. I woke up one night thinking that someone was hitting wooden blocks and it was just the person sleeping next to me smacking their lips softly in their sleep.

The best thing about the sesshin was that I found I could do it. Maybe Suzuki-roshi sent me there because of timing, After the sesshin I came back and saw Suzuki-roshi. In the summer I took the wife and kids to Tassajara. It was my first trip West. While there I had my first glimpse of what Zen was about. I told Suzuki-roshi about it and he agreed that that might be the case. Back in Mass I continued to practice zazen and made periodic trips back to the West Coast and when I went I always had contact with the Zen Center, interaction with Suzuki-roshi and some of his students like Yvonne or Katherine Thanas.

I mentioned this to Craig Boyan, the one who went to the Meyer Baba group, and Craig went running upstairs and he came back and said Suzuki-roshi will see you now. Of course, this could have just been a form of encouragement. So I continued and continued seeing him whenever I went there.

In 71 we moved to the West Coast. It was the year he died. In the final ceremony where he handed over the temple to Dick Baker, the Mountain Seat Ceremony, as he came down from the dais and walked out, he looked directly at me and shook his staff. Where he was was where I wanted to be - in that place of sanity. Later with Etta, reading the teaching stories of Adris Shah, we had that same sense of there being something there we wanted. The teaching stories had a kind of nutrition, water for thirst.

It seemed there was something going on there. He thought that people should just sit around and talk about what they got from him, how their lives and experiences developed. What did those who studied with him get out of it? I asked him what he got out of it and he said that sort of information comes out best in a group experience. They talked to Suzuki-roshi and described all their experiences and said that they had gained a higher state from it and asked what shall we do now?

He said, "Concentrate on your breathing and it will go away. So I sat daily on a rock. In time I started to notice more detail in the rocks and trees, started to perceive an emanation coming from them, from everything, something intrinsically very valuable. I wanted to get closer to it. It lasted for the summer. I began med. I wanted to understand it. I went back to my college and saw my old poetry professor. I almost left med.

I was determined to get back to that experience though and began reading mystical literature of various kinds. In the late sixties when I had published a paper on meditation Ralph Metzner came over and told me about Millbrook and suggested that I go there and take LSD with them and my analyst said I should do that in a more legit way. Willis Harmon later of the Noetics Inst. I had a research grant also to study meditation. It was like a freight train from consciousness. I brought in pictures of my family and things that were familiar.

I think they were testing a theory that a big one time intensive experience could bring about helpful changes. I think you need more time than that.

DIN 1055-6 PDF

Arthur J. Deikman

It gave me the most freedom. I could get research grants because anything could be considered part of the mind. After two weeks of that, colors became brighter. Something emanated from the sky and trees.

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Dr. Arthur J. Deikman

Deikman took part in a one-year research seminar on new religious movements in order to gain a better understanding of the attraction these movements had exercised on many Americans in the s and s. English Choose a language for shopping. Arthur J. Aside from her potentially suicidal behavior and that of many others, during the eleven months of the ward program, there were no suicides or suicide attempts.

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